Tag: 70273 around the world (Page 1 of 4)

Happy Fourth Birthday to Us!

Pairs of red X’s cover a white cloth

Quilt 31

Pairs of red X’s on a white quilt

Quilt 652

Pairs of red X’s on backgrounds of white

72 Blocks made by Alida Palmisano

Four years ago today, I gave myself the best birthday present ever when I mashed the “publish” button and launched The 70273 Project. What an incredible, amazing, astonishing four years it has been.

Looking Back

Our first blocks came from Kitty Sorgen less than 2 weeks of that first post. News of the project spread like wildfire, confirming that the kind, compassionate people in the world outnumber the bad folks, something I’d long suspected. Three days later, Margaret Williams did some experimenting and tutorials. And we were off! Throughout the four years, we received blocks from quilt guilds, schools, churches, families, and communities around the world.

Our first major European exhibit – in Lacaze, France, curated by Katell Renon and Cecile Milhau – was a mere 16 months after launch.  We’ve had exhibits literally around the world –  in Munich, Celle, and Dachau Germany, Durham Cathedral (U.K.); Rochester Cathedral (U.K.); the Channel Islands, throughout America, in Canada, Scotland, at the International Quilt Festival, in Charleville, France (I can’t wait to tell you more about this one!) curated by Annie Labruyere, and many more I’ve not yet written about. But I will.

Our quilts have been on exhibit – which means our stories have been told –  literally around the world. Working together with hundreds of thousands of people, we’ve made the world smaller and become friends – often dear friends – with people on the other side of the globe from us. We’ve made the world a kinder, more compassionate place.

Now and When

I would like to be able to tell you exactly how many block and quilts we have today, but the truth of the matter is that I’m behind on the record keeping side of the project. As y’all may know, The Engineer and I were home only 4 non-consecutive weeks in 2018 while traveling for The 70273 Project (a big bouquet of gratitude to everyone who made it such an amazing, memorable year). Then in 2019 I was diagnosed with wet macular degeneration, and took what amounts to an unscheduled sabbatical as I surrendered to the depression that followed.

I am delighted to tell you that we are learning to live together, my new vision and I, and though I still have my low vision/low spirit days, I now feel ready to push up my sleeves and lead us to the finish line. And just like in the very beginning when I asked for help because I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that I could not commemorate these 70,273 precious souls without assistance, I am going to need help to get us to the Finish Line.

When I put out the call on 14 February 2016, y’all responded immediately with great enthusiasm and dedication. In the coming weeks, I will once again be posting Help Needed opportunities. I thank you in advance for stepping up and stepping in to help complete our commemorations in ways that will allow these important stories to continue to be told throughout the land and to ensure that those we commemorate and those we celebrate are never forgotten or overlooked again.

One Thing You Can Do Today

Yesterday I opened registration for the online life story writing gathering I’m offering called Keepsake Writers. We’ll gather weekly beginning 09 March 2020 to capture and preserve our life stories. I hope you’ll join in and create something  you and future generations will treasure. If you can’t participate right now, perhaps you’d be willing to share the link with your friends and family in case they are interested. All proceeds go directly into The 70273 Project to help fund the things I’ll be telling you about soon.

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From the Archives: U.K. Quilts and Exhibits

A quilt with a white background covered in pairs of red X’s hanging high in an ancient cathedral

Durham Cathedral

White quilts covered with pairs of red X’s draped over church pews and chairs

Durham Cathedral

White quilts covered with pairs of red X’s draped over church pews and chairs and on the floor

Durham Cathedral

Two white banners covered with pairs of red X’s hang in the front of an ancient cathedral

Rochester Cathedral

White quilts covered with pairs of red X’s hang in an ancient cathedral

Rochester Cathedral

White quilts covered with pairs of red X’s on display in an ancient cathedral

Rochester Cathedral

White quilts covered with pairs of red X’s

Jersey Heritage Center and Museum, Channel Islands U.K.

White quilts covered with pairs of red X’s on display in a museum

Jersey Heritage Center and Museum, Channel Islands, U.K.

White quilts covered with pairs of red X’s on display in a museum

Jersey Heritage Center and Museum, Channel Islands, U.K.

 

Every year Europeans mark Holocaust Remembrance Day at the end of January. The Engineer, Tari Vickery, and I are honored to be in attendance and participate in January 2018. Quilts of The 70273 Project were on display in Durham Cathedral, Rochester Cathedral, and the Jersey Heritage Center and Museum in the Channel Islands. It’s been two years, and I still can’t adequately express my feelings or tell you about the people, the quilts, the stories, the connections, the tears of laughter, sorrow, and of Knowing, the immense hospitality and warm welcome. I’m still processing . . . And smiling . . . And chortling . . . And whispering gratitude. What an honor it was to meet people I knew only in social media, to bear witness to their stories, to feel the power of the quilts they made.

A big, huge, ginormous bouquet of gratitude to The 70273 Project Ambassadors – Margaret Jackson, Mary Turner, and Christine FitzGerald in Durham; Lucy Horner in Rochester; and Kim Monins and Gisele Therezien in the Channel Islands – who spent countless hours scheduling, coordinating, and staging Block Drives and these massive exhibits. And more bouquets of gratitude to the patient, supportive spouses, siblings, children, pets, grandchildren, and friends like Sharon Howell, Bev Bunn, Wendy Dawes, Edina Geering, Beryl Connelly, Annie Labruyere, Sue Harris, and countless – and I do mean countless – others in the U.K. who went above and beyond to commemorate tens of thousands of those we memorialize and create exhibits and events that will not soon be forgotten by those of us in attendance.

In case you’re wondering, The Engineer, Tari, and I paid our own way to these exhibits – as we always do – and we’re very grateful to those who gave us a bed to sleep on, fed  us, and ferried us hither and yon while we were there. Whenever we travel to an exhibit, each of us pays to take an extra large suitcase so we can bring home as many quilts as possible. We still have a few quilts in need of a ride home from Durham, however, so if you’d like to give them wings, please donate what you can and help us get them home to 70273 Project Heartquarters. When you donate through the Pay Pal Giving Fund, it only takes a few minutes to register and designate The 70273 Project – a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation – as the charity to receive your donation. There are no fees deducted when donating through The Pay Pal Giving Fund, which means The 70273 Project keeps your entire donation. Thank you in advance.

Be watching this space for what’s ahead for The 70273 Project. Subscribe to the blog, to the newsletter..

Quilts Exhibited in Munich, Germany

Who:Quiltundtextilkunst

What: Quilts of The 70273 Project made in Germany and one quilt from Israel

When: 01 September to 15 September, 2018 / Monday to Friday: 10 to 18 / Saturday 10 to 16

Where: Munich, Sebastiansplatz (walking distance from suburban train station Marienplatz, so really in the centre), opposite the new Synagogue

3 women standing in front of several white quilts embellished with pairs of red x's

L to R: Barbara Stöger, Lydia Pallauf, Annemarie Pattis

How: This exhibit is possible thanks to the efforts of Uta Lenk, 70273 Project Ambassador in Germany; and Barbara Stöger, Lydia Pallauf, Annemarie Pattis who helped hang the exhibit as well as members of the Dachau Patchwork Guild who secured a space for The 70273 Project quilts in this magnificent exhibit.

Tell everybody you know who lives in or near or visits Germany and encourage them to visit this moving exhibit. (And to send me photos).

~~~~~~~

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Jersey, Channel Island Quilts

Kim Monins and Gisele Therezien have been Ambassadors for The 70273 Project from the get-go (note the quilt numbers), ultimately convincing people in every Parish and most (if not all) of the reporters they contacted to make blocks. They’ve been involved in the project so long, in fact, that Kim was scanning and labeling each individual block just like I do here. That simply was not sustainable, yet I had already counted some of those individual blocks, so I’ve spent many spare minutes sifting through the good information Kim compiled along with my records to make sure I didn’t duplicate blocks. Now it is done, so allow me to introduce you to these beautiful Jersey, Channel Island quilts. Unless otherwise noted, all photos were made by Kim Monins. Don’t the quilts look right at home in this breath-taking landscape?

Quilt #35

Made by Members of the Jersey Modern Quilt Guild
Gisele Therein
Kim Monins
Liz Webb
Anne Hill
Sue Harris
Rosalie Hollis
Lorrain Brogan
Lucy Baker
Becky Porter
Val Porter
Ella Andrews
Jackie Tardivel
Ella Andrews
Angela Rybarczuk
Jenny Marshall
Karen Scott for beautiful people whose individualism never had the chance to shine
Elizabeth Webb for Capt. David Seath who died during the London Marathon 2016

 

Quilt #87

Quilt # 87 made by Gisele Therezien using blocks
made by Grouville parishioners in Jersey, UK
Janet Harrison
Julie Le Bailly
Christopher Clark
Margaret LeQuesne
Patricia Gurgan for The Doublet Bros.
Mandy Corbett
Dorothy Perriot
Cara Leanne Thomson
Anthea Pomroy
Karen Clark
Mobile Waring
Maureen Harrison
Miriam Higginson
Sylvia Milne
John Edward LeMaistre for Edna and Alan LeMaistre
Charlie McArdle for all those whose fate was sealed with 2 crosses
Ian Webb for Dianne Neal, great Aunt who worked at Bletchlley Park during WW II

 

Quilt #88

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. Brelade’s  parishioners in Jersey, UK
Joanne Anderson
Margaret Bellee
Anonymous
Cara Bryant
Veronica Bryant
Betty Bullock for Elizabeth Nicholson
Joan Couvain
Maureen Cobon
Sheila de Caux
Betty Ellis
David Ellis
Laura Ferdinando
Sarah Fitz
Julie Long
Charlotte Monins
Daniel Monins
Steve Monins
Mrs. Rita Pinel
Sarah Raper
Fiona Smith
Sheila Sykes
Mrs. Pauline D. Tagg
Eric Vezie
Marlee Vezie
Susan Ann Le Gresley for Almire Norman
Revd Jo Milliner for all the wonderful contributions which those with Downs make to our world
Andy Milliner for all my mentally handicapped pupils I taught in my 30 years in Special Education
Helen Miles for Duncan Brian Sykes (brother born with Down Syndrome) and Autism Jersey

 

Quilt #89

Quilt made by Gisele Therezien using blocks made by
St. Clement’s parishioners in Jersey, UK
Sarah Weymouth
Natalie Payne
Cassie Leeuwenburg
Muriel Freeman
Irene Beaumont
Jean Anderson
Ann Laframboise
Christine Bunting

Quilt #90

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. Lawrence parishioners in Jersey, UK
Lynn Bouchard
Mrs. Gladys Dunell
Mrs. Brenda Emmanuel
Jackie Le Brun
Lynne Lusby
Deidre Mezbourian
Mary Mimmack
Mary Moody
Holly-Hope Perrier
Ann Pipon
Sienna Springett
Simone Springett
Theo Springett
Norma Thomas
Margaret Ward

 

Quilt #91

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. John’s  parishioners in Jersey, UK
Sandra Coutanche
Vivienne Day
Thelma Fry
Carole Gowlett
Suzanne La Marquand
Dary Monins
Pat Monins
Mrs. Jane Osborne
Emily Renouf
Sophie Renouf
Sue Renouf
Stuart Rowe
Denise (Dee) Shrives
Jill Keogh

 

Quilt #92

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
Gladys Dunell for the Parish of St. Lawrence in Jersey, UK

 

Quilt #93

Quilt made by Gisele Therein using blocks made by
St. Martin’s parishioners in Jersey, UK
Mrs. Barbara Le Troquer
Jo Ann Perchard
Annie M. Richardson
Jane Hardy
Helen Toole
Diana Toole
Carole L Broco
Stephen Gooch
Mr. Michel Le Troquer
Anastasia Stone
Paddy Haversham-Quaid
Alice Ferguson
Susan Cuming for Sheila and Stanislaw Elimek
Lizzie Keogh
Miriam Gotrel-Hill
Megan Gaudin
Marlene Henley
Joan Richard

 

Quilt #94

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. Mary’s  parishioners in Jersey, UK
Jennifer Bratch
Anne Harris
Sue Heppolette
Sharon Knight

 

Quilt #95

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. Ouen Parishioners:
Loretta Cullinaine
Joyce Du Feu
Amy Milner
Emilia Milner
Carolyn Romeril
Mrs. Pauline Syvret
Alex Vautier
Anonymous
Mrs. Brenda Ann Pirozzolo for The Hurel Boys
Theresa Crehan-Ferey for Gary Marck Ferey (husband)

 

Quilt #96

Made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. Peter’s parishioners in Jersey, UK
Joan Adamson
Margaret Finch
Connor Le Cuirot
Val Le Cuirot for April Gren and Ivy Evans
Yolanda Logan
Pippin Newton
Freya Pallant
Brenda Smith
Jean M. Vibert

 

Quilt #97

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. Saviour’s parishioners in Jersey, UK
Gisele Therein
Kim Monins
Liz Webb
Anne Hill
Sue Harris
Rosalie Hollis
Lorraine Whiting
Jane Mallet
Ella Andrews
Fatima Dos Reis
Linda Denny
Caroline Glamey
Anonymous
Ella Andrews
Lynsey Hairon
Julie Ferrey
Angela Journeaux
Astrid Corbel & Laura Goldstein
Tina Ware
Kathleen McGill
Linda Denny
Kerry Moisan
Tina Anne Ware
Lynsay Hairon
Linda Denneny
Caroline Blamey
Jane Mallet
Barbara Coram
Pat Derrien
Mary Milon
Janet Averty
Jean Renouf
Beverly Ferey
Margery Gallichan
Sue Quérée
Dawn Heaney for the none survivors
Sadie Le Sueur Rennard for Caroline Monamy

 

Quilt #98

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
Trinity parishioners in Jersey, UK
Jennifer Bell
Anonymous
Philippa Bertram
Eliana Cowslip
Andrea Elcock
Poppy-Anne Elcock
Tammy Fage
Jayne Grochy
Alison Keogh
Karen Minty
Mrs. Margaret Moisan
Sarah Nugent
Jane Powell
Daphne Tingley
Mrs. J. R. Leighton for James Ross and Philip Leighton, our sons
Carol-Anne Philpott for all the people who suffered under the Nazis
Mrs. K. Powell for Victor Amos Letchford who died in France during World War I

 

Quilt #99

Quilt and blocks made by Kim Monins
for the Parish Of St. Brelade in Jersey, UK

 

Quilt #133

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by Jackie le Brun
for the Parish of St. Lawrence in Jersey, UK

 

Quilt #167

Quilt made by Gisele Therezien using blocks made by
Theresa Crehan-Ferey in memory of her husband
whose racing number was 67.
Photo by Gisele Therezien

 

Quilt #255

Quilt made by Gisele Therein, using blocks made by Barbara Le Troquer
for the Parish of St. Martin in Jersey, UK

 

Quilt #260

a Middling made by Sue Harris for the Parish of St. Brelade in Jersey, UK
(I met Sue when I was there to see the exhibit in January 2018.)

 

Quilt #261

a Middling made by Gisele Therezien
Photo by Gisele Therezien

 

Quilt # 273

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by Margaret Bellee,
for the Parish of St. Brelade in Jersey, UK

 

Quilt #335

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by
St. Helier parishioners in Jersey, UK

 

Quilt #336

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by Lynn Bouchard,
for the Parish of St. Lawrence in Jersey, UK

 

Quilt #367

Quilt made by Kim Monins using blocks made by Kerry-Jane Warner
for the Parish of St. Helier in Jersey, UK

Information on two Jersey quilts got lost somewhere between
this gorgeous spot of earth and me.
Will post I when the information on Quilt #337 and #394 is found.

And you want to know something fun and thoughtful? When Tari Vickery, The Engineer, and I were there in January 2018 to see the exhibit of all of these quilts at the Jersey Heritage Center, Kim drove us around to see most, if not all, of her photo locations. (Tari, Andy, and I plan to go back and visit One Day. It’s gorgeous.)

The addition of these quilts brings our new Block Count to . . . 41,084!

A huge thank you to Kim and her husband Steve; Gisele and her son Ed; and all the people who commemorated. I can’t wait to visit again.

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St. John’s Notting Hill Exhibit

a reverend stands before white quilts adorned with pairs of red X's

If you’re in the vicinity of London and would like to see some of The 70273 Project quilts, you must find your way to St. John’s Notting Hill before 10 May 2018. When I first heard from The Rev’d Canon William Taylor, he wrote: “I have been very moved by the exhibition and am working with the Serbian Orthodox Church on the genocide of the Second World War. I would like to offer to hose the exhibition in London after it comes down at Rochester. Would that be possible?”Thanks to the efforts and assistance of Lucy Horner, it was not only possible, this exhibit happened.

3 empty walls waiting for quilts to be hung

the inside of a cathedral

two large banners, each bearing 2 red X's and from the ceiling of a cathedral

a wall covered with quilts with a white base, each filled with pairs of red X's

inside a cathedral

inside a cathedral

inside a cathedral

The quilts come down on 10 May 2018, so go on now, scoot. Thank you, William, for displaying the quilts and giving others an opportunity to experience them, and thank you, Lucy Horner, for all the time and energy you continue to devote to The 70273 Project.

Would you like to host an exhibit? Let me know.

~~~~~~~

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Let’s Welcome The Netherlands

04May18

After agonizing over it a while, The Engineer and I opt to go to lunch together, and sure enough what we feared would happen, did. We get back to the exhibit to find a note in our journal from a woman that I would love to have met. Fortunately (1) we eat fast and (2) she comes back, and now you get to meet her, too. Yvonne promises to galvanize the Netherlands and get them into The 70273 Project in a big way. And one detail I’m not sure she mentions in the video: though they’re not Jewish, she and her husband live in a Jewish cemetery. Every year on Memorial Day, school children come in to help clean the graves, put out flowers, and hear stories from Holocaust survivors.

two women stand beside a multi-colored quilt

At the end of the day as we are leaving, we take the circuitous route (we do every day when entering and leaving) so we can view more of the amazing quilts on display, I hear my name and look around to see Yvonne beckoning me over. She’s won a Teacher’s Award ribbon, and oh my goodness is it an award ever well-earned.

a closeup of small quilts sewn together to make a large quilt

 

a closeup of the border of a quilt

I couldn’t get a photo of the entire quilt because there were so many people standing around admiring it, but I’ll get one today before the crowds arrive and add it here. It is 225 mini quilts stitched together and surrounded by a spectacular border . . . and it’s all hand pieced and quilted. Yes, really.

You know how you meet someone and feel an instant connection and desire to spend more time with them? Well, Yvonne is on that list with so many other people we’ve met along the way. I sense (well, hope) a visit to the Netherlands in my future, and maybe Yvonne and her husband would like to come spend some time atop a mountain beside a waterfall.

I have so many more stories and photos to tell y’all, but when I sit down at the computer at night, I go to sleep! They’ll come. I promise.

I am, however, able to upload a few short videos if you’re interested.

~~~~~~~

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Durham Cathedral Quilts Added to the Count

an ancient cathedral made of brown bricks

The Coxhoe Quilters who hail from Durham, U.K. have been commemorating people through The 70273 Project from the get-go. Their first quilt is #33 – that should tell you something.  Many of the quilts made by the Coxhoe Quilters  were displayed in  Durham Cathedral in January 2018 as part of Holocaust Remembrance Day. Some of the quilts made by the Coxhoe Quilters have already been added to the block count, and as you can tell, it’s taken me a while to find the time to sift my way through the records to pull out what’s already been counted so there’s no duplication that leaves us short of our goal.

Here are the quilts made by the tireless and talented Coxhoe Quilters. Some have already been profiled in a blog post, all will be eventually.

9 women hold a quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 33
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by:
Anne Barre
Christine FitzGerald (dedicated to Elizabeth FitzGerald)
Ann Hewitt
Margaret Jackson
Dawn Kirk Walton
Karen Mitchell
Anonymous
Norma Corner
Patricia Harvey
Lesley Shell
Janice Tilbury
Alison Wilson

a white quilt covered in pairs of red X's

Quilt 39
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by members of Coxhoe Quilters (U.K.)

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 71
Pieced and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Quilted by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by members of Brighter Skies Group:
Elizabeth Budgeon
Savvy Christophides
Jane Coulter
Joyce Duncan
Chrissy FitzGerald
Margaret Grieves
Helen Grindley
Margaret jackson
C. Knight
Mary Turner
Shirley Oliver
V. Pearson
Linda Smalley
Ellen Smith
Anonymous

a large white quilt covered with pairs of red X's covers a sofa

Quilt 72
Pieced and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Quilted by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by members of the Brighter Skies/Leisure Time Crafting
Jacqueline Ellis
A. Turner
Ann Hewitt
V. Pearson
Mary Turner
Jean Rees
Ellen Smith
Carol Chisholm
Brian Clarke
Margaret jackson
Margaret Grieves
Jane Coulter
Kieran Ryan
Emmajayne Sanders
Jan Tilbury
Joyce Duncan
Ellis Rowe
M. Burns
N. Collins
Heather Ryan
C. Knight
W. Crac
R. Mindiff
Lesley Snell
Savvy Christophides
Anonymous

a large white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 79
Pieced and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Quilted by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by:
Ann Hewitt
Barbara Harland
Chrissy FitzGerald
Ellen Smith
Emmajayne Sanders
Glenda Connor
Jan Tilbury
Jane Coulter
Janet Emery
Jane Hedley
Katie Wilson-Clement
Lesley Snell
Lorna Presly
Margaret Jackson
Marjorie Powell
Mary Turner
Pamela McRobert-Watkins
Pat Wiffin
S. Barker
Shirley Oliver
Suzanne Hopper
V. Pearson
Wendy Gibson

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 122
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson, (U.K.)
Blocks made by:
Students at Deaf Hill Primary School
Assisted by Janet Watson of Age
Volunteers with the Intergenerational Project (U.K.)

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 123
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by students of Ferryhill Business and Enterprise College (U.K.)

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 124
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by students at King James College (U.K.)

a long white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 125
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by three generations of Margaret Jackson’s family:
Steven Wiley
Sharmai Wiley
Cnheylee Wiley
Demi-lea Wiley
Alisha Wiley
Margaret Jackson

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 126
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by students at Hermitage Academy (U.K.)

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 148
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by Members of Coxhoe Beaver Scout Group

a white quilt with pairs of red X's

Quilt 149
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by Eva Jackson of Coxhoe Durham, U.K.

a small white quilt covered with many pairs of red X's

Quilt 150
Made by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)

Quilt 163
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by members of the Thames Valley Contemporary Textiles (U.K.)

a small white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 170
a Middling made by Ann Hewitt

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 171
Pieced by Ann Hewitt (U.K.)
Quilted by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Finished by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by Members of The Art Group (UK):
Michelle Taylor
Michelle F. Taylor
Anonymous
B. Dyer
M. Simpson
S. Barker
Julie
Audrey Gillet
Gwyneth Halliburton
Noreen Freeman
Dorothy Sheroot
Mary Turner
Jean Lister
Lynda Elston
Debbie Duncan

a group of women hold a large white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 173
Pieced, Tied, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by:
Members of Leisure Time Crafting and Brighter Skies ,
a Fundraising Group of Spennymore, Durham, U.K.

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 240
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by members of the Durham Embroiderers Guild (U.K.)
Rita Bell
Eileen Hunter
Sarah McGeorge
Lesley Wood
Alisa Dredge
Rona Bruce, dedicated to Lynne Herkes 30Dec58 – 31Dec58
Lesley Hagan, dedicated to Sarah and Stephen Hagan Hord

a large white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 241
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by:
People from Coxhoe
Members of Painting for Pleasure Art Group
People in various villages in Durham, England, U.K.

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 242
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by:
Ann Hewitt
Wendy Gibson
Pat Harvey
Isla Green (5 years old)
Mary Woodward
Amanda Coltas
Alison Wilson
Lesley Snell
Karen Mitchell
Chrissy FitzGerald
Margaret Jackson
E. Budgeon
Anonymous

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 243
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by students at Hermitage Academy (U.K.)

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 244
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by members of Coxhoe Quilters (U.K.)
Chrissy FitzGerald
Eva Jackson
Margaret Jackson
Mary Turner

a white quilt covered wit pairs of red X's

Quilt 256
Pieced, Quilten, and Finished by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by members of Thornily Library Age Concern Craft Group (U.K.)
Celia Turnbull
L. Watson
Elizabeth Ann Smith
Marlene Jones
Ethel Howarth
Margaret A. Ollett
Florence Ann Richardson

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 257
Pieced and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Quilted by Mary Turner (U.K.)
Blocks made by citizens of Durham, U.K.
M. Jackson
Lorn Presley
Melanie Tolson
S. Barker
Janet Emery
Brenda Press
Edna Oswald
Ann Hewitt
Suzanne Hopper
V. Pearson
J. Stephenson
P.  Harvey
Lesley Snell
Samantha Sproates
Carol Chisholm
Emmajayne Saunders
Shirley Oliver
Anonymous

a white quilt covered with pairs of red X's

Quilt 258
Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson (U.K.)
Blocks made by people from Dean Bank Crafters, FerryhillDurham, England U.K.

When I add the Durham/Coxhoe Quilters blocks that haven’t been counted to the block count, i brings our new total of commemorations to 37,754. Now I finish sifting and tallying block snd quilts from the Channel Islands. Stay tuned for a new block count soon.

To Margaret Jackson, Chrissy FitzGerald, Mary Turner, their husbands John, Steve, and John, the other members of the Coxhoe Quilters, to Charlotte, and to all the citizens of Durham  – A great big Thank you. Your dedication to commemorating and your hospitality when The Engineer and I were there in January will be long remembered and always appreciated.

Margaret Jackson took all the photos except the first one of Durham Cathedral. I took that one. It’s majestic, isn’t it? She doesn’t take a bad picture, that Durham Cathedral. I have more I’ll share with you soon.

Quilts Made and Exhibited in Dachau, Germany

Woman standing in front of a quilt made of pairs of red X's on a white background

On Thursday, April 5, 2018, German Ambassador for The 70273 Project Uta Lenk made her way to Dachau where the local quilting group displayed the seven quilts they made for The 70273 Project commemorating over 200 people. The quilts – quilted by Renate Poignee, Heike Rosenbaum and Uta –  were deliberately made in memory of the people who were taken out and murdered in the years of the T4 program of the National Socialists from the Franciscan Schönbrunn.

women stand in front of 3 quilts made with pairs of red X's on a white background

women admire quilts made of pairs of red X's on a white background

“It was interesting to hear from the members of the group how much the participation in this memorial moved people,” writes Uta on her blog  “That was similar to me, if I had the blocks on the stand sewed, there is still a lot in Germany that has not been addressed sufficiently,” . (Translation provided by Google Translate.)

two nuns and two other women chat about the quilts made for The 70273 Project

A  nun in attendance is head of the institution from which 207 people were taken during the reign of Aktion T4.

four quilts of The 70273 Project made in Dachau, Germany. White quilts covered with pairs of red X's.

In the next few weeks, the finished quilts can be viewed in the classroom of arttextil in Dachau, where they will hang over several weeks before coming to the United States (HeartQuarters of The 70273 Project) by fall of 2018 to join and be exhibited with the other quilts of The 70273 Project.

Many thanks to Uta for the countless hours she devotes to making the world a better place. I’m so grateful The 70273 Project is on her list of worthwhile projects. And thanks to all who made blocks; to Renate, Heike, and Uta for quilting these beautiful commemorations; and to all the other folks in Germany (and beyond) who vow to help commemorate every single one of the 70,273 people who deserved to live.

SaveSave

The Dean of Rochester Cathedral on The 70273 Project

Take a few minutes to see what Dean Phil has to say about The 70273 Project.

As time permits, I’m adding videos to The 70273 Project You Tube Channel. Nine or 12 more subscribers and I’ll be able to get us our own customized URL for our channel, so if you would be so kind as to go subscribe and to encourage friends and family to subscribe, I’d be ever so grateful.

While you’re there, stroll around the channel to have a look at the videos there, and be sure to visit again often because I’m constantly adding videos.

Thank you, Dean Phil, for having The 70273 Project in your beautiful cathedral, and thank you, Lucy Horner, for all you did to get the quilts there and for making sure I saw this lovely video. There’s so much more to come, so subscribe to the blog and subscribe to the occasional newsletter so you’ll be in the know.

Quilts at Durham Cathedral

a quilt made of pairs of red x's sewn onto a white background hands in Durham Cathedral

Today, January 27, is Holocaust Remembrance Day
– a day chosen because it marks the anniversary
of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto a white background

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto a white background

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto white background fabric are displayed in Durham Cathedral in the U.K.

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto a white background are draped over pews in Durham Cathedral in the U.K.

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto a white background are on display at Durham Cathedral in the U.K.

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto white background fabric are on display at Durham Cathedral in the U.K.

At Durham Cathedral,
it is being observed with a display of quilts
of The 70273 Project.
You saw some of them yesterday.

Thank you, Margaret Jackson, for the photos.

students stitch pairs of red X's onto white cloth to commemorate one disabled person murdered under Aktion T4

students stitch pairs of red X's onto white cloth to commemorate one disabled person murdered under Aktion T4

students stitch pairs of red X's onto white cloth to commemorate one disabled person murdered under Aktion T4

students stitch pairs of red X's onto white cloth to commemorate one disabled person murdered under Aktion T4

A Holocaust Remembrance Day service was held,
and throughout the day,
students and adults stopped
to commemorate others
by making blocks.

a woman wearing a shirt identifying her as "police" stands to the left of a man wearing a badge

This Durham police officer and Constable
vow to organize an effort to encourage
Young Cadets to make blocks and quilts.

“Our hope for being a compassionate, caring world
lies with the children.”

~ Tari Vickery

Thank you, Tari Vickery, for these words and these photos.

And thank you Coxhoe Quilters for continuing
to commemorate the 70,273 people we honor
and for all the work you do with children.

Margaret Jackson created The 70273 Project Teacher’s Information Booklet.
Feel free to download and use, along with any other
information on the Resources for Educators page.

Find more about the efforts of Coxhoe Quilters:
here
here
here

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