Tag: fabric

Straight Lines to the Rescue

the fabric pull Kirk/Curt really likes

To say my life is a little chaotic right now is to become the poster child for understatement.

I haven’t picked up cloth and thread in about a year and seriously wondered if I ever would again. Then in the middle of yet another insomnia-filled night, an idea: I need straight lines. So today, while The Engineer headed to the DIY home improvement store, I browsed the quilt store, and because you’ve never seen how fast The Engineer can move through Lowe’s when I’m at the fabric store, I snatched – and I do mean snatched – bolts off the shelves if they made my heart sing. That was my only criteria. My. heart had to SING, y’all, cause I have no earthly idea what I’m going to make with this fabric, only that I am going to cut it in straight lines, step one.

As he was cutting, Kirk/Curt(?) – a man I’ve never seen before – kept saying “This is my favorite. No, this one if my favorite.” and so on. When everything was cut, he said he’d made a list of the fabrics I selected, then he came around the counter and snapped a couple of photos. “These are beautiful fabrics that are even more beautiful together,” he said, “and I don’t use the word ‘beautiful’ ever.” (For the record, I’ve never been complimented for my fabric pulls or my sense of color.) He took my money, then gave me his card making me promise to either bring in the finished quilt or at least email him a photo, something I promised faithfully I’d do . . . if he still works there 14 years from now when I get it finished.

His kind, encouraging words were so incredibly appreciated today, y’all, which just goes to show that you never know whose day you will brighten and steer back on the path of hope and promise with a few well, chosen, heartfelt words of praise. What say we make a pact to sow a daily kind, uplifting word garden to folks we know and folks we may never see again? Can’t hurt, might help,doesn’t cost a thing, and you just never know the powerful gift your words might deliver to someone at just the right time.

the audio version, read by Jeanne herself

well, shoot

Forgotten2

i had an idea
that tickled me.
i bought the unlikely thrift shop fabrics
for it:
men’s pajamas
(tops only cause call me crazy,
but i couldn’t
fathom handling where some
strange man’s privates had been).
women’s skirts.
women’s blouses.
all laundered
folded
and ready to be
disassembled
for the great
reassembling.
only in the two weeks
i’ve been gone,
i forgot the idea.

scratch linens

i’m spent. seriously. i’m spent to the bone. it’s the move – sure. of course it is. but it’s more than that. allergies, i think. could be. yep, that’s a possibility. then it hits me: i haven’t created anything in weeks. months even.

sure, i’ve nested and placed things and revamped and repurposed and reconfigured – and that is a type of creativity, but my hands ache to create something from scratch, to make the familiar new. they ache, i tell you.

so yesterday i made a quick dash through a vintage store in search of fabrics that caught my eye. didn’t give myself time to think or ponder or justify – just grabbed things that appealed to me, and here’s what i brought home:

Tablelinens1

i am blank – couldn’t buy an image or an idea if i knew where to look. so tomorrow i’ll just start fiddling with these 4 white(ish) linens and see where this takes me.

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